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Hibbard, George A., 1864-1910

 Person

Biography

George Albee Hibbard was born October 27; 1864, in Boston, and was educated in the Boston public schools. His father was a strong antislavery man. At twenty, Hibbard was a clerk in Quincy Market working for his father, a wholesale produce dealer. Later he went into the insurance business, became a member of a firm of commercial paper dealers, then finally, treasurer of a tailoring company. As a businessman, he was not a success. He entered politics, served on ward and city Republican committees, managed minor companies, and was elected in 1894 to the state Legislature, and missed by one vote being elected to the office of state Treasurer to fill out the unexpired term of Henry M. Phillips.

After serving in the lower house of the Legislature, he was appointed postmaster of Boston in 1890, making such an efficient and honest public servant that in 1908 he defeated John F. Fitzgerald for mayor in a closely fought campaign. He gave the city so efficient a business administration that he effected savings in one year of over a million dollars. He removed all "students" and politicians who were not needed from the city payroll, and paid no attention to the slates of appointments made by the professional politicians. He naturally made many enemies, and under the provisions of the new charter the Reformers chose James J. Storrow instead of Hibbard as the Reform candidate. Hibbard, with no money and against the advice of many of his best friends, ran independently, but was badly beaten. Mayor-elect Fitzgerald named him for City Collector, but the Civil Service Commission rejected his name, and Hibbard died shortly afterward, on May 29, 1910, a disappointed man, feeling that his efforts to give his city an honest and efficient administration had not been appreciated by the very ones who desired economy and efficiency in public affairs. "In spite of mistakes, he ended all known practices of a vicious nature embraced within the meaning of the term 'graft,' " said John A. Sullivan, chairman of the Finance Commission at the time.

Taken from "Boston's 45 Mayors from John Phillips to Kevin H. White," City Record, Boston, 1979.

Found in 3 Collections and/or Records:

Mayor George A. Hibbard, 1908-1909, undated

 Item
Identifier: 5210004_015_035
Scope and Contents From the Collection:

Photographs and other images collected by the Boston Landmarks Commission for reference use and for publications as well as photographs taken by the Landmarks Commission documenting their work and city neighborhoods.

Dates: undated

Mayoral addresses

 Series
Identifier: 0200.001
Scope and Contents

Includes two compilation volumes of addresses from 1822-1867 and printed copies of annual and inaugural addresses of the Mayor from 1824-1980 with gaps.

Dates: 1822-1980 with gaps

Report of the second special commission appointed by his honor George A. Hibbard, Mayor of Boston to investigate the collection and disposal of refuse in the City of Boston, 1910

 Item — Publications: PB 021
Scope and Contents From the Series:

Collection of publications produced by the Mayor's Office and various offices within the Mayor's Office on many topics relating to Boston.

Dates: Other: 1910