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Brimmer, Martin, 1793-1847

 Person

Biography

The ninth mayor of Boston, Martin Brimmer was described as "a most amiable and upright character, a gentlemen without reproach, and a most useful citizen." He was born in Roxbury, on June 8, 1793, the son of Martin and Sarah Brimmer; graduated from Harvard in 1814, where he was captain of the University Corps; and began business in the store of Theodore Lyman, Jr., but later went with Isaac Winslow and Company on Long Wharf. He was alderman in 1838, and mayor for two years.

He was interested in education and, at his own expense, printed and distributed to every school in Massachusetts "The School and the Schoolmaster." Militia affairs also attracted his attention. He was an ensign in the Third Regiment, Third Brigade, First Division, in 1815, 1816, and 1817, and lieutenant of the same in 1818. From 1819 to 1822, inclusive, he was captain of the Rangers, and brigade general under General Lyman from 1823 to 1826, inclusive. He became captain of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company in 1826, and in 1845, commander of the reorganized Independent Corps of Cadets.

Brimmer was elected mayor as the Whig candidate. He had made a study of the disciplining and construction of prisons, and made suggestions that were carried out when the prison was erected on Charles Street. He believed in extending and beautifying the streets and the public places, in giving careful attention to health and police matters, and in a liberal encouragement of charitable and literary institutions. His death occurred on April 25, 1847.

Taken from "Boston's 45 Mayors from John Phillips to Kevin H. White," City Record, Boston, 1979.

Found in 1 Collection or Record:

Mayoral addresses

 Series
Identifier: 0200.001
Scope and Contents

Includes two compilation volumes of addresses from 1822-1867 and printed copies of annual and inaugural addresses of the Mayor from 1824-1980 with gaps.

Dates: 1822-1980 with gaps